Label GMO Foods

IN THE DARK — While the U.S. remains the only industrialized country without mandatory GMO labeling, some major grocery stores, like Whole Foods, have committed to label foods containing genetically modified ingredients. We're calling on Harris Teeter and its parent company Kroger to take the lead and start labeling their store-brand products that contain GMOs.

The Right To Know What We’re Eating

We passed a federal law requiring manufacturers to list ingredients and other nutrition information on food packaging. We now use this information to make responsible food choices. More than 60 countries, including the entire European Union, already require GMO labeling, but in the U.S., consumers are still denied this basic information.

Concerns About GMOs

Most of the food available on store shelves contains genetically modified ingredients—and it’s not without risk. Crops that are genetically modified are designed for increased pesticides and herbicides, which have been linked to serious health and evnrionemental impacts.

We Need Harris Teeter and Its Parent Company Kroger To Be A Leader

Monsanto and other giant agribusinesses are spending millions to oppose labeling efforts—Big Ag spent more than $50 million against labeling initiatives in California and Washington. But we can overcome Big Ag: More than 96 percent of the public polled supports labeling GMOs. People are increasingly concerned about food choices and taking charge of their health, but we can't wait for Congress to pass a national GMO labeling law. Instead, we need Harris Teeter and its parent company Kroger to take the lead and start labeling their store-brand products that contain GMOs.

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